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NASA's Next Generation of Space Vehicles
49,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Having retired its Space Shuttle program in 2011, after 30 years of service and 135 missions, for now NASA uses Russian Soyuz rockets to fly their astronauts to the International Space Station until their next manned space craft enters service in 2016. Learn more about the agency's next launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, as well as the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle it will carry in this book.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Zond Program
45,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Zondwas the name given to two series of Soviet unmanned space missions undertaken from 1964 to 1970 to gather information about nearby planets and to test spacecraft. The second series used a stripped-down variant of the manned Soyuz spacecraft, consisting of the service and descent modules, but lacking the orbital module.The first three missions were based on the model 3MV planetary probe, intended to explore Venus and Mars. After two failures, Zond 3 was sent on a test mission, photographing the far side of the Moon (only the second spacecraft to do so) and continuing out to the orbit of Mars in order to test telemetry and spacecraft systems.The missions 4 through 8 were test flights under for the Soviet Moonshot during the Moon race. The Soyuz 7K-L1 (also mentioned just as L1) spacecraft was used for the moon-aimed missions, stripped down to make it possible to launch around the moon from the Earth. They were launched on the Proton rocket which was just powerful enough to send the Zond on a free-return trajectory around the moon without going into lunar orbit (the same path that Apollo 13 flew in its emergency abort).

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Oleg Grigoryevich Makarov
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Oleg Grigoryevich Makarov (Russian: ) (January 6, 1933 May 28, 2003) was a Soviet cosmonaut. Makarov was born in Udomlya, Tver Oblast, USSR. He graduated from Bauman Moscow Higher Technical School in 1957 and started working at the Special Design Bureau Number One (which is now RSC Energia) as an engineer, working on the Vostok spacecraft. In 1966, he was selected for cosmonaut training. At first he did work on the Soviet lunar program and was training with Aleksei Leonov for a circumlunar flight. After the success of Apollo 8, however, the flight was cancelled. His first spaceflight was Soyuz 12 in 1973, a test flight to check the changes made to the Soyuz spacecraft after the Soyuz 11 disaster. His second flight was the abortive Soyuz 18a that made an emergency landing in the Altay Mountains, 21 minutes after launch. With his third launch on Soyuz 27 he flew to space station Salyut 6 and landed five days later with the Soyuz 26 spacecraft.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Energiya-Buran
121,00 CHF *
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In Energiya-Buran: the Soviet Space Shuttle, the authors describe the long development path of the Soviet space shuttle system, consisting of the Energiya rocket and the Buran orbiter. The program eventually saw just one unmanned flight in November 1988 before the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union sealed its fate. After a Foreword provided by lead Buran test pilot Igor Volk, the authors look at the experience gradually accumulated in high-speed aeronautics with the development of various Soviet rocket planes and intercontinental cruise missiles between the 1930s to 1950s and the study of several small spaceplanes in the 1960s. Next the authors explain how the perceived military threat of the US Space Shuttle led to the decision in February 1976 to build a Soviet equivalent, and explore the evolution of the design until it was frozen in 1979. Following this is a detailed technical description of both Energiya and Buran and a look at nominal flight scenarios and emergency situations, highlighting similarities and differences with the US Space Shuttle. The authors then expand on the managerial aspects of the Energiya-Buran program, sum up the main design bureaus and production facilities involved in the project and describe the infrastructure needed to transport the hardware and prepare it for launch at the Baikonur cosmodrome. They go on to detail the selection and training of teams of civilian and military test pilots for Buran, crew assignments for the first manned missions and preparatory flights aboard Soyuz spacecraft. Next the focus turns to the extensive test program that preceded the first flight of Buran, notably the often trouble-plagued test firings of rocket engines, the first flight of Energiya with the enigmatic Polyus payload, test flights of subscale models and atmospheric approach and landing tests. After an analysis of Western speculation on the Soviet space shuttle effort in the pre-glasnost era, a detailed account is given of final preparations for the maiden flight of Buran and the mission itself. In the final chapters the authors look at the gradual demise of the project in the early 1990s, the fate of the Soviet orbiters and their cosmodrome infrastructure, cancelled missions, and the many planned derivatives of the Energiya rocket. Attention is also paid to technological spin-offs such as the Zenit and Sea Launch projects and the RD-180 and RD-191 rocket engines. Finally, an overview is given of alternative spaceplane proposals during and after the Buran era, including the MAKS air-launched spaceplane, the Kliper spacecraft and various single-stage-to-orbit systems. The book closes off with key specifications of the Energiya-Buran system, short biographies of the Buran pilots, an extensive list of Russian acronyms, a short bibliographical essay and a detailed index. Based largely on Russian sources, it is richly illustrated with some 250 pictures and diagrams. Although Energiya-Buran was primarily a program of unfulfilled promises and shattered dreams, it represented a major technological breakthrough for the Soviet Union and its story deserves to be told.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Out of ORBIT: The True Story of How Three Astro...
15,90 CHF *
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An incredible, true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all--outer spaceIn the nearly forty years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has come to be seen as a routine enterprise--at least until the shuttle 'Columbia' disintegrated like the 'Challenger' before it, reminding us, once again, that the dangers are all too real. 'Too Far from Home 'vividly captures the hazardous realities of space travel. Every time an astronaut makes the trip into space, he faces the possibility of death from the slightest mechanical error or instance of bad luck: a cracked O-ring, an errant piece of space junk, an oxygen leak . . . There are a myriad of frighteningly probable events that would result in an astronaut's death. In fact, twenty-one people who have attempted the journey have been killed. Yet for a special breed of individual, the call of space is worth the risk. Men such as U.S. astronauts Donald Pettit and Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin, who in November 2002 left on what was to be a routine fourteen-week mission maintaining the International Space Station. But then, on February 23, 2003, the 'Columbia' exploded beneath them. Despite the numerous news reports examining the tragedy, the public remained largely unaware that three men remained orbiting the earth. With the launch program suspended indefinitely, these astronauts had suddenly lost their ride home. 'Too Far from Home' chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built 'Soyuz TMA-1' capsule, whose technology dated from the late 1960s (in 1971 a malfunction in the 'Soyuz 11' capsule left three Russian astronauts dead.) Despite the inherent danger, the 'Soyuz' became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Pettit home. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty and mystique of space travel, while reminding us all how perilous it is to soar beyond the sky.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Skylab Saturn Ib Flight Manual
43,90 CHF *
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Created as an aid for the astronauts training for Skylab missions, this Skylab Saturn IB Flight Manual is a comprehensive reference that contains descriptions of ground support interfaces, prelaunch operations, and emergency procedures. It also summarizes mission variables and constraints, mission control monitoring and data flow during launch and flight. Launch vehicle SL-2 (SA-206; first Skylab manned mission) was used as the baseline for the manual, but the material is also representative of the SL-3 and SL-4 launch vehicles. Also known as the 'Uprated Saturn I', Saturn IB was first launched in 1966. The IB replaced the Saturn I's S-IV second stage with the more powerful S-IVB, allowing it to carry a partially fueled Apollo Command / Service Module or fully fueled Lunar Module into low Earth orbit. The Saturn IB allowed critical testing of the Apollo Program's systems to be conducted long before the Saturn V was ready. It also flew one orbital mission without a payload, with the extra fuel used to demonstrate that the S-IVB's J-2 engine could be restarted in zero gravity - a critical operation for translunar injection. The Saturn IB had a height of 141.6 feet and a mass of 1.3 million pounds without payload. It produced thrust equivalent to 1.6 million pounds force, and could carry 46,000 pounds of payload to low Earth orbit. Saturn IB flew nine times, including three Skylab missions and for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. Complete with many informative diagrams and photos, this manual is a wonderful reference for the museum docent, researcher, or anyone who ever wondered how these mighty rockets were designed and built.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Praxis Manned Spaceflight Log 1961-2006
50,90 CHF *
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Praxis Log of Manned Spaceflight 1961-2006 will open with a section entitled: Quest for Space, which will provide an explanation of the methods employed to get in and out of orbit and brief overviews of the different international space programmes. It will be a complete chronological log of all attempted orbital manned spaceflights, including the X-15 'astroflights' of the 1960s that only achieved an altitude of c. 50 miles and the two 1961 Mercury and Redstone missions which were non-orbital. There will be an image depicting each manned spaceflight, and data boxes containing brief biographies of all the space travellers and basic flight data. The main text will be a narrative of each mission, its highlights and accomplishments, including those strange facts and humorous stories that are connected to every mission. By targeting publication in September 2006, the return to flight of the Shuttle, two more Soyuz TMA launches and, quite possibly, a second Chinese manned mission. The resulting book will be a handy reference to all manned spaceflights, the names astronauts and cosmonauts who flew on each mission, and their roles and accomplishments. Recent announcements of a return to the Moon and eventual manned flights to Mars, as new hardware and procedures are developed to support these long-range programs, emphasizes the case for future updates of this book. TOC:From the contents: The Profile of Manned Spaceflight.- Methods of Leaving Earth.- Methods of Spaceflight.- Methods of Returning to Earth.- 2. Manned Spaceflight Programmes.- X-15 Rocket Research Aircraft and the X-20 Dyna Soar.- Vostok and Voskhod.- Mercury.- Gemini and the USAF Manned Orbiting Laboratory.- Apollo and Skylab.- Soyuz and Zond.- Salyut and Almaz.- Mir.- Shuttle and Spacelab.- Buran And Hermes.- International Space Station.- 3. Quest for Space.- X-15 Astro Flights 1962-1968.- Mercury Sub Orbital Missions 1961 Mercury 3 and Mercury 4.- Apollo 1 Pad Fire In January 1967.- Launch Pad Aborts Including The 1983 Soyuz Pad Explosion and Various.- Shuttle Pad Aborts.- 4. Manned Spaceflight Log.- 1961 - 2006.- Appendix.- World Manned Space Missions 1961-2006.- World Space Explorers 1961-2006.- World Spaceflight Experience 1961-2006.- Bibliography and References.- Index.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Energiya-Buran
81,90 CHF *
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In Energiya-Buran: the Soviet Space Shuttle, the authors describe the long development path of the Soviet space shuttle system, consisting of the Energiya rocket and the Buran orbiter. The program eventually saw just one unmanned flight in November 1988 before the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union sealed its fate. After a Foreword provided by lead Buran test pilot Igor Volk, the authors look at the experience gradually accumulated in high-speed aeronautics with the development of various Soviet rocket planes and intercontinental cruise missiles between the 1930s to 1950s and the study of several small spaceplanes in the 1960s. Next the authors explain how the perceived military threat of the US Space Shuttle led to the decision in February 1976 to build a Soviet equivalent, and explore the evolution of the design until it was frozen in 1979. Following this is a detailed technical description of both Energiya and Buran and a look at nominal flight scenarios and emergency situations, highlighting similarities and differences with the US Space Shuttle. The authors then expand on the managerial aspects of the Energiya-Buran program, sum up the main design bureaus and production facilities involved in the project and describe the infrastructure needed to transport the hardware and prepare it for launch at the Baikonur cosmodrome. They go on to detail the selection and training of teams of civilian and military test pilots for Buran, crew assignments for the first manned missions and preparatory flights aboard Soyuz spacecraft. Next the focus turns to the extensive test program that preceded the first flight of Buran, notably the often trouble-plagued test firings of rocket engines, the first flight of Energiya with the enigmatic Polyus payload, test flights of subscale models and atmospheric approach and landing tests. After an analysis of Western speculation on the Soviet space shuttle effort in the pre-glasnost era, a detailed account is given of final preparations for the maiden flight of Buran and the mission itself. In the final chapters the authors look at the gradual demise of the project in the early 1990s, the fate of the Soviet orbiters and their cosmodrome infrastructure, cancelled missions, and the many planned derivatives of the Energiya rocket. Attention is also paid to technological spin-offs such as the Zenit and Sea Launch projects and the RD-180 and RD-191 rocket engines. Finally, an overview is given of alternative spaceplane proposals during and after the Buran era, including the MAKS air-launched spaceplane, the Kliper spacecraft and various single-stage-to-orbit systems. The book closes off with key specifications of the Energiya-Buran system, short biographies of the Buran pilots, an extensive list of Russian acronyms, a short bibliographical essay and a detailed index. Based largely on Russian sources, it is richly illustrated with some 250 pictures and diagrams. Although Energiya-Buran was primarily a program of unfulfilled promises and shattered dreams, it represented a major technological breakthrough for the Soviet Union and its story deserves to be told. TOC:Foreword.- Authors Preface.- Acknowledgements, glossary, notes.- List of Tables.- List of Illustrations.- Prologue.- 1 Origins.- 2 Structures, Systems and Scenarios.- 3 Ground Support.- 4 Buran Cosmonaut Detachment.- 5 Preparing for Flight.- 6 Snowstorm in Orbit.- 7 Shattered Dreams.- Appendix (A, B, C and D).- Bibliography.- Index.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Energiya-Buran
65,99 € *
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In Energiya-Buran: the Soviet Space Shuttle, the authors describe the long development path of the Soviet space shuttle system, consisting of the Energiya rocket and the Buran orbiter. The program eventually saw just one unmanned flight in November 1988 before the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union sealed its fate. After a Foreword provided by lead Buran test pilot Igor Volk, the authors look at the experience gradually accumulated in high-speed aeronautics with the development of various Soviet rocket planes and intercontinental cruise missiles between the 1930s to 1950s and the study of several small spaceplanes in the 1960s. Next the authors explain how the perceived military threat of the US Space Shuttle led to the decision in February 1976 to build a Soviet equivalent, and explore the evolution of the design until it was frozen in 1979. Following this is a detailed technical description of both Energiya and Buran and a look at nominal flight scenarios and emergency situations, highlighting similarities and differences with the US Space Shuttle. The authors then expand on the managerial aspects of the Energiya-Buran program, sum up the main design bureaus and production facilities involved in the project and describe the infrastructure needed to transport the hardware and prepare it for launch at the Baikonur cosmodrome. They go on to detail the selection and training of teams of civilian and military test pilots for Buran, crew assignments for the first manned missions and preparatory flights aboard Soyuz spacecraft. Next the focus turns to the extensive test program that preceded the first flight of Buran, notably the often trouble-plagued test firings of rocket engines, the first flight of Energiya with the enigmatic Polyus payload, test flights of subscale models and atmospheric approach and landing tests. After an analysis of Western speculation on the Soviet space shuttle effort in the pre-glasnost era, a detailed account is given of final preparations for the maiden flight of Buran and the mission itself. In the final chapters the authors look at the gradual demise of the project in the early 1990s, the fate of the Soviet orbiters and their cosmodrome infrastructure, cancelled missions, and the many planned derivatives of the Energiya rocket. Attention is also paid to technological spin-offs such as the Zenit and Sea Launch projects and the RD-180 and RD-191 rocket engines. Finally, an overview is given of alternative spaceplane proposals during and after the Buran era, including the MAKS air-launched spaceplane, the Kliper spacecraft and various single-stage-to-orbit systems. The book closes off with key specifications of the Energiya-Buran system, short biographies of the Buran pilots, an extensive list of Russian acronyms, a short bibliographical essay and a detailed index. Based largely on Russian sources, it is richly illustrated with some 250 pictures and diagrams. Although Energiya-Buran was primarily a program of unfulfilled promises and shattered dreams, it represented a major technological breakthrough for the Soviet Union and its story deserves to be told.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 12.07.2020
Zum Angebot