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Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39
39,00 € *
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Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) is a rocket launch site at the John F. Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island in Florida, USA. The site and its collection of facilities were originally built for the Apollo program, and later modified to support Space Shuttle operations. NASA began modifying LC-39 in 2007 to accommodate Project Constellation. Launches from LC-39 are supervised from the Launch Control Center, located 3 miles (4.8 km) from the launch pads. LC- 39 is one of several launch sites that share the Eastern Test Range. Launch Complex 39 comprises the 2 launch pads, the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), the Crawlerway (the route used by crawler-transporters to carry Mobile Launch Platforms between the VAB and the pads), the Orbiter Processing Facility buildings, the Launch Control Center (which contains the firing rooms), the KSC Press Site (famous for the iconic countdown clock and flag seen in television coverage), and various logistical and operational support buildings.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 17.01.2020
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Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39
40,10 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) is a rocket launch site at the John F. Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island in Florida, USA. The site and its collection of facilities were originally built for the Apollo program, and later modified to support Space Shuttle operations. NASA began modifying LC-39 in 2007 to accommodate Project Constellation. Launches from LC-39 are supervised from the Launch Control Center, located 3 miles (4.8 km) from the launch pads. LC- 39 is one of several launch sites that share the Eastern Test Range. Launch Complex 39 comprises the 2 launch pads, the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), the Crawlerway (the route used by crawler-transporters to carry Mobile Launch Platforms between the VAB and the pads), the Orbiter Processing Facility buildings, the Launch Control Center (which contains the firing rooms), the KSC Press Site (famous for the iconic countdown clock and flag seen in television coverage), and various logistical and operational support buildings.

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 17.01.2020
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LEGO City Space Port: Deep Space Rocket and Lau...
86,49 € *
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LEGO® City Space Agency needs you! Prepare for the launch of the Deep Space Rocket from the NASA-inspired launchpad with the scientists and astronauts. Test the rover to ensure it’s ready to pick up the geode samples in the training area, while the robot studies the ground for interesting artifacts. Load the telescope onto the rocket for its flight, then get the astronauts to the monorail so they can get on board. Head back to Launch Control and watch the countdown, it's almost time for launch! Pssst! Did you know that this playset is inspired by real-life NASA missions? Cool, right! Features: Includes 6 LEGO® City minifigures: 2 astronauts, 2 scientists, Launch Director and a ground crew technician, plus a robot figure. Features a modular, multi-stage NASA-inspired rocket that can be customised in different ways with the booster, payload storage and 2-minifigure cockpit modules, rover with articulated, new-for-June-2019 grappling arm, space telescope with folding solar panels and magnifying glass, plus a monorail system with multi-stop track and 2 cars. The detailed toy playset includes an opening launch control tower with removable window, 2 desks with small screens, large screens for countdown and monitoring of the telescope and space to insert a mobile device, as well as a launchpad with opening tower arms to launch the rocket, plus a ground research area with a tile with secret symbol Accessory elements include 2 new-for-June-2019 geodes, 2 helmets with blue visors, a magnifying glass, scanner element, tile with secret symbol, circular saw, wrench, mobile phone, 4 water elements and a camera, plus a brick separator. Lower the gates to stop the monorail cars along the route and help climb aboard or exit a car. Aim the robot’s scanner over the tile in the research area to see the secret symbol. Set a mobile device into the launch control tower to experience the interactive play options available when connected to the LEGO® City Explorers app. Drop the tower arms on the launchpad to launch the rocket and head to space. Use the LEGO® Life app to access the intuitive Instructions PLUS building instructions. Help even younger builders through the building process, with easy-to-use zoom, rotate and ghost-mode functions to visualise their creations as they go. Download the LEGO® Life app at the iOS or Android app store. Ask your parents' permission before going online. Rocket standing measures over 16” (42cm) high, 4” (11cm) wide and 2” (6cm) deep. Space telescope with wings closed measures over 3” (9cm) long and 1 (3cm) wide. Rover with arm retracted measures over 1” (5cm) high, 3” (9cm) long and 2” (7cm) wide. Launch Control closed measures over 7” (18cm) high, 5” (13cm) wide and 5” (13cm) deep. Launchpad with closed tower arms measures over 9” (24cm) high, 4” (12cm) wide and 4” (12cm) deep. Monorail measures over 1” (3cm) high, 3” (10cm) long and 1” (3cm) wide. Monorail track measures over 3” (8cm) high,14” (36 cm) deep and 18” (47cm) wide. Age: 7+ Number of Pieces: 837

Anbieter: Sowaswillichauch
Stand: 17.01.2020
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LEGO City Space Port: Deep Space Rocket and Lau...
107,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

LEGO® City Space Agency needs you! Prepare for the launch of the Deep Space Rocket from the NASA-inspired launchpad with the scientists and astronauts. Test the rover to ensure it’s ready to pick up the geode samples in the training area, while the robot studies the ground for interesting artifacts. Load the telescope onto the rocket for its flight, then get the astronauts to the monorail so they can get on board. Head back to Launch Control and watch the countdown, it's almost time for launch! Pssst! Did you know that this playset is inspired by real-life NASA missions? Cool, right! Features: Includes 6 LEGO® City minifigures: 2 astronauts, 2 scientists, Launch Director and a ground crew technician, plus a robot figure. Features a modular, multi-stage NASA-inspired rocket that can be customised in different ways with the booster, payload storage and 2-minifigure cockpit modules, rover with articulated, new-for-June-2019 grappling arm, space telescope with folding solar panels and magnifying glass, plus a monorail system with multi-stop track and 2 cars. The detailed toy playset includes an opening launch control tower with removable window, 2 desks with small screens, large screens for countdown and monitoring of the telescope and space to insert a mobile device, as well as a launchpad with opening tower arms to launch the rocket, plus a ground research area with a tile with secret symbol Accessory elements include 2 new-for-June-2019 geodes, 2 helmets with blue visors, a magnifying glass, scanner element, tile with secret symbol, circular saw, wrench, mobile phone, 4 water elements and a camera, plus a brick separator. Lower the gates to stop the monorail cars along the route and help climb aboard or exit a car. Aim the robot’s scanner over the tile in the research area to see the secret symbol. Set a mobile device into the launch control tower to experience the interactive play options available when connected to the LEGO® City Explorers app. Drop the tower arms on the launchpad to launch the rocket and head to space. Use the LEGO® Life app to access the intuitive Instructions PLUS building instructions. Help even younger builders through the building process, with easy-to-use zoom, rotate and ghost-mode functions to visualise their creations as they go. Download the LEGO® Life app at the iOS or Android app store. Ask your parents' permission before going online. Rocket standing measures over 16” (42cm) high, 4” (11cm) wide and 2” (6cm) deep. Space telescope with wings closed measures over 3” (9cm) long and 1 (3cm) wide. Rover with arm retracted measures over 1” (5cm) high, 3” (9cm) long and 2” (7cm) wide. Launch Control closed measures over 7” (18cm) high, 5” (13cm) wide and 5” (13cm) deep. Launchpad with closed tower arms measures over 9” (24cm) high, 4” (12cm) wide and 4” (12cm) deep. Monorail measures over 1” (3cm) high, 3” (10cm) long and 1” (3cm) wide. Monorail track measures over 3” (8cm) high,14” (36 cm) deep and 18” (47cm) wide. Age: 7+ Number of Pieces: 837

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 17.01.2020
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Space Launch
34,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! In addition, if orbit is required, then much higher energy is needed as some sideways speed is needed. The speed needed depends on the altitude, less speed is needed at high altitude, however allowing for the extra potential energy due to altitude, overall, far more energy is needed to orbit at high altitude than lower. The speed needed to maintain an orbit, near to the Earth's surface corresponds to a sideways speed of about 7.8 km/s, an energy of about 60MJ/kg. This is several times the energy per kg of practical rocket propellant mixes. Gaining the kinetic energy is awkward as the airdrag tends to slow the spacecraft, so rocket powered spacecraft generally fly a compromise trajectory that leaves the thickest part of the atmosphere very early on, and then fly on for example, a Hohmann transfer orbit to reach the particular orbit that is required. This minimises the airdrag as well as minimising the time that the vehicle spends holding itself up.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 17.01.2020
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Space Launch
35,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! In addition, if orbit is required, then much higher energy is needed as some sideways speed is needed. The speed needed depends on the altitude, less speed is needed at high altitude, however allowing for the extra potential energy due to altitude, overall, far more energy is needed to orbit at high altitude than lower. The speed needed to maintain an orbit, near to the Earth's surface corresponds to a sideways speed of about 7.8 km/s, an energy of about 60MJ/kg. This is several times the energy per kg of practical rocket propellant mixes. Gaining the kinetic energy is awkward as the airdrag tends to slow the spacecraft, so rocket powered spacecraft generally fly a compromise trajectory that leaves the thickest part of the atmosphere very early on, and then fly on for example, a Hohmann transfer orbit to reach the particular orbit that is required. This minimises the airdrag as well as minimising the time that the vehicle spends holding itself up.

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 17.01.2020
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Emerging Space Powers
46,77 € *
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This work introduces the important emerging space powers of the world.Brian Harvey describes the origins of the Japanese space program, from rocket designs based on WW II German U-boats to tiny solid fuel 'pencil' rockets, which led to the launch of the first Japanese satellite in 1970. The next two chapters relate how Japan expanded its space program, developing small satellites into astronomical observatories and sending missions to the Moon, Mars, comet Halley, and asteroids.Chapter 4 describes how India's Vikram Sarabhai developed a sounding rocket program in the 1960s. The following chapter describes the expansion of the Indian space program. Chapter 6 relates how the Indian space program is looking ahead to the success of the moon probe Chandrayan, due to launch in 2008, and its first manned launching in 2014. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 demonstrate how, in Iran, communications and remote sensing drive space technology.Chapter 10 outlines Brazil's road to space, begun in the mid-1960's with the launch of the Sonda sounding rockets. The following two chapters describe Brazil's satellites and space launch systems and plans for the future. Chapters 13 and 14 study Israel's space industry. The next chapters look at the burgeoning space programs of North and South Korea.The book ends by contrasting and comparing all the space programs and speculating how they may evolve in the future. An appendix lists all launches and launch attempts to date of the emerging space powers.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 17.01.2020
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Emerging Space Powers
46,77 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This work introduces the important emerging space powers of the world.Brian Harvey describes the origins of the Japanese space program, from rocket designs based on WW II German U-boats to tiny solid fuel 'pencil' rockets, which led to the launch of the first Japanese satellite in 1970. The next two chapters relate how Japan expanded its space program, developing small satellites into astronomical observatories and sending missions to the Moon, Mars, comet Halley, and asteroids.Chapter 4 describes how India's Vikram Sarabhai developed a sounding rocket program in the 1960s. The following chapter describes the expansion of the Indian space program. Chapter 6 relates how the Indian space program is looking ahead to the success of the moon probe Chandrayan, due to launch in 2008, and its first manned launching in 2014. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 demonstrate how, in Iran, communications and remote sensing drive space technology.Chapter 10 outlines Brazil's road to space, begun in the mid-1960's with the launch of the Sonda sounding rockets. The following two chapters describe Brazil's satellites and space launch systems and plans for the future. Chapters 13 and 14 study Israel's space industry. The next chapters look at the burgeoning space programs of North and South Korea.The book ends by contrasting and comparing all the space programs and speculating how they may evolve in the future. An appendix lists all launches and launch attempts to date of the emerging space powers.

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 17.01.2020
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ProjeVega (Rocket)
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Vega is an expendable launch system being developed for Arianespace jointly by the Italian Space Agency and the European Space Agency. Development began in 1998 and the first launch, which will take place from the Guiana Space Centre, is planned for November 2010 or early 2011. It is named from the star Vega. It is designed to launch small payloads: 300 to 2,000 kg satellites for scientific and Earth observation missions to polar and low Earth orbits. The reference Vega mission is a polar orbit bringing a spacecraft of 1,500 kilograms to an altitude of 700 kilometers.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 17.01.2020
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